The One Year Anniversary: The Aftermath of #AliceStorm

The following post, by Robert R. Sachs, first appeared on the Bilski Blog, and it is reposted here with permission. It’s been one year since the Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank. On its face the opinion was relatively conservative, cautioning courts to “tread carefully” before invalidating patents, and emphasizing that the … Continue reading “The One Year Anniversary: The Aftermath of #AliceStorm”

Unintended Consequences of “Patent Reform”: The Customer Suit Exception

In the last two weeks, the House and Senate Judiciary Committees marked up wide-ranging patent legislation ostensibly aimed at combating frivolous litigation by so-called “patent trolls.” But while the stated purpose of the House and Senate bills—H.R. 9 (the “Innovation Act”) and S. 1137 (the “PATENT Act”), respectively—is to combat abusive litigation, a closer look … Continue reading “Unintended Consequences of “Patent Reform”: The Customer Suit Exception”

CPIP Supports Guidelines for the Protection of Fundamental IP Rights

February 2, 2015 The Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property (CPIP) is proud to join today’s open letter to Congress providing a set of guidelines for considering laws and regulations governing intellectual property. The letter outlines some of the fundamental economic and moral considerations that underscore the benefits of strong intellectual property rights. Framed by the following guidelines, the letter … Continue reading “CPIP Supports Guidelines for the Protection of Fundamental IP Rights”

Cohen et al. “Patent Trolls” Study Uses Incomplete Data, Performs Flawed Empirical Tests, and Makes Unsupportable Findings

PDF summary available here I.   Introduction A recent draft study about patent licensing companies entitled “Patent Trolls: Evidence from Targeted Firms” is making the rounds on Capitol Hill and receiving press coverage. This attention is unfortunate, because the study is deeply flawed and its conclusions cannot and should not be relied upon. If the … Continue reading “Cohen et al. “Patent Trolls” Study Uses Incomplete Data, Performs Flawed Empirical Tests, and Makes Unsupportable Findings”

Supreme Court Revises Fee-Shifting Rules in Patent Cases: Weeding out Bad Actors in a Level Playing Field

By Adam Mossoff* and Brian O’Shaughnessy† Originally published in LES (USA & Canada)’s weekly e-newsletter, Insights. On April 29, 2014, the Supreme Court handed down two unanimous decisions in Octane Fitness v. ICON Health & Fitness and Highmark v. Allcare Health Management System, which radically overhaul the rules governing court-awarded attorneys’ fees in patent cases. In brief, the … Continue reading “Supreme Court Revises Fee-Shifting Rules in Patent Cases: Weeding out Bad Actors in a Level Playing Field”

The Unintended Consequences of Patent "Reform"

By Steven Tjoe Much of today’s patent policy debate focuses on the dynamics of patent litigation.  Sensational anecdotes of abusive demand letters, litigants strategically exploiting bad patents, and tales of so-called “patent trolls” (reinforced by now debunked empirical claims) have captured the public’s imagination and spurred Congress to rush to revise the patent system.  Unfortunately, … Continue reading “The Unintended Consequences of Patent "Reform"”

Taking a Whack at the DMCA: The Problem of Continuous Re-Posting

By Steven Tjoe On Thursday March 13, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s (DMCA) notice and takedown system.  Among the witnesses testifying at the hearing was CPIP Fellow Professor Sean O’Connor (Washington University School of Law), who offered his insights on Section 512 from his unique position as … Continue reading “Taking a Whack at the DMCA: The Problem of Continuous Re-Posting”

Improving the DMCA's Notice and Takedown System

In conjunction with today’s House Judiciary Committee hearing on the DMCA, CPIP Senior Scholar Prof. Mark Schultz published a critique of the notice and takedown system this morning on AEI’s TechPolicyDaily Blog. In his critique, Prof. Schultz discusses CPIP’s policy brief by Prof. Bruce Boyden, which details the failures of the DMCA – despite the massive number of takedown notices sent, not a … Continue reading “Improving the DMCA's Notice and Takedown System”

Adam Mossoff on Patented Innovation, Licensing & Litigation (Transcript)

Below is the text of the oral testimony provided by Professor Adam Mossoff to the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, the Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance Subcommittee, in its November 7, 2013 hearing on “Demand Letters and Consumer Protection: Examining Deceptive Practices by Patent Assertion Entities.” Information on the hearing is here, including … Continue reading “Adam Mossoff on Patented Innovation, Licensing & Litigation (Transcript)”

GAO Report Confirms No “Patent Troll” Litigation Problem

As we previously reported, there are serious concerns with the studies asserting that a “patent litigation explosion” has been caused by patent licensing companies (so-called non-practicing entities (“NPEs”) or “patent trolls”). These seemingly alarming studies (see here and here) have drawn scholarly criticism for their use of proprietary, secret data collected from companies like RPX … Continue reading “GAO Report Confirms No “Patent Troll” Litigation Problem”