George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School

FTC Chair and Commissioners Weigh in on SEP Litigation at the ITC

The following post comes from Jack Ring, a rising 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at C-IP2.

a gavel lying on a table in front of booksI. INTRODUCTION

In a previous blog post, we discussed the dispute surrounding standard essential patents (SEPs) between Philips and Thales. Read more

Hudson Institute Panel Focuses on Patent Litigation in China

The following post comes from Wade Cribbs, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP.

a gavel lying on a desk in front of booksBy Wade Cribbs

Questions about how Chinese patent protection operates in the international patent landscape are relevant to both companies doing business in China and policymakers in the United States. Read more

Professors Erika Lietzan and Kristina Acri on “Distorted Drug Patents”

The following post comes from Austin Shaffer, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP.

pharmaceuticalsBy Austin Shaffer

In their new paper, Distorted Drug Patents, CPIP Senior Scholar Erika Lietzan of Mizzou Law and Kristina Acri of Colorado College explore a paradox in our patent system: Innovators are less motivated to work on drugs that take more time to develop as drug research incentives are being skewed away from the harder problems (e.g. Read more

Forty Years Since Diamond v. Chakrabarty: Legal Underpinnings and its Impact on the Biotechnology Industry and Society

U.S. Supreme Court buildingCPIP has published a new policy brief celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the Diamond v. Chakrabarty decision, where the Supreme Court in 1980 held that a genetically modified bacteria was patentable subject matter. The brief, entitled Forty Years Since Diamond v. Read more

USPTO-DOJ Workshop on Promoting Innovation in the Life Science Sector: Day Two Recap

The following post comes from Austin Shaffer, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. 

night view of Washington, D.C.By Austin Shaffer

This past fall, the Department of Justice (DOJ) and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) hosted day two of their public workshop to discuss the importance of intellectual property rights and pro-competitive collaborations for life sciences companies, research institutions, and American consumers. Read more

USPTO-DOJ Workshop on Promoting Innovation in the Life Science Sector: Day One Recap

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP.

night view of Washington, D.C.By Colin Kreutzer

This past fall, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) hosted a joint workshop with the Department of Justice (DOJ) entitled Promoting Innovation in the Life Sciences Sector and Supporting Pro-Competitive Collaborations: The Role of Intellectual Property. Read more

Professor Daryl Lim Explores the Doctrine of Equivalents and Equitable Triggers

The following post comes from Yumi Oda, an LLM Candidate at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP.

files labeled as "patents"By Yumi Oda

The term “claims” may not mean much to many, but it means the world to most patent practitioners. As Judge Giles Rich once observed, “[t]he name of the game is the claim.” Read more

Professor Tabrez Ebrahim on Artificial Intelligence Inventions

The following post comes from Associate Professor of Law Tabrez Ebrahim of California Western School of Law in San Diego, California.

a pair of glasses, an apple, and a stack of booksBy Tabrez Ebrahim

Artificial intelligence (AI) is a major concern to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), for patent theory and policy, and for society. Read more

Rethinking § 101: Professor Talha Syed Takes a Different Look at Subject Matter Eligibility

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP.

shelves full of booksBy Colin Kreutzer

When most people think of patentability requirements, they think of whether an invention has been “done before.” Novelty and non-obviousness under 35 U.S.C. Read more