Panel Discussion: Vaccines, Intellectual Property, and Global Equity

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at C-IP2.  The COVID-19 pandemic has shined a spotlight on the role of intellectual property in modern medicine and on the complex social questions surrounding a system that grants exclusive rights over life-or-death products. On the one hand, there … Continue reading “Panel Discussion: Vaccines, Intellectual Property, and Global Equity”

WTO IP Waiver Too Simplistic: Global Vaccine Tech-Transfer Needs Other Strategies

By Yogesh Pai Since October 2020, India and South Africa, joined by two-thirds of the WTO Members (African Group, LDCs and most of developing world) have been actively pursuing other developed country Members to agree to their request to waive global intellectual property (IP) rules. The waiver asserts that by suspending IP protection for COVID-19 … Continue reading “WTO IP Waiver Too Simplistic: Global Vaccine Tech-Transfer Needs Other Strategies”

Professor Tabrez Ebrahim on Clean and Sustainable Technological Innovation

The following post comes from Associate Professor of Law Tabrez Ebrahim of California Western School of Law in San Diego, California. By Tabrez Ebrahim What role should patent law have in promoting environmentally friendly, clean, and sustainable technology innovation? Does patent law provide adequate incentives for inventions and innovation that address environmental problems? Clean technology … Continue reading “Professor Tabrez Ebrahim on Clean and Sustainable Technological Innovation”

Accenture Report Outlines How 5G Technology Accelerates Economic Growth

The following post comes from Wade Cribbs, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Wade Cribbs Everyone in the technology industry knows that 5G is posed to revolutionize the world, but the finer points of 5G’s impact on the U.S. economy are detailed in a new report by Accenture entitled … Continue reading “Accenture Report Outlines How 5G Technology Accelerates Economic Growth”

UC Hastings’ Evergreen Drug Patent Search Database: A Look Behind the Statistics Reveals Problems with this Approach to Identifying and Quantifying So-Called “Evergreening”

The Center for Innovation, housed at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, has created an Evergreen Drug Patent Search Database (the “Evergreening Database,” or “Database”).[1] The Database was created to address the perceived problem of “evergreening,” which the Database defines as “pharmaceutical company actions that artificially extend the protection horizon, or cliff, … Continue reading “UC Hastings’ Evergreen Drug Patent Search Database: A Look Behind the Statistics Reveals Problems with this Approach to Identifying and Quantifying So-Called “Evergreening””

Jonathan Barnett on Competition Regulators and Standard-Essential Patents

The following post comes from Connor Sherman, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Connor Sherman The field of intellectual property (IP) can sometimes be wrong in its approach towards promoting economic health, especially when that approach overlaps with antitrust law. An example of this is laid out in a … Continue reading “Jonathan Barnett on Competition Regulators and Standard-Essential Patents”

Professors Erika Lietzan and Kristina Acri on “Distorted Drug Patents”

The following post comes from Austin Shaffer, a 2L at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Austin Shaffer In their new paper, Distorted Drug Patents, CPIP Senior Scholar Erika Lietzan of Mizzou Law and Kristina Acri of Colorado College explore a paradox in our patent system: Innovators are less motivated to work … Continue reading “Professors Erika Lietzan and Kristina Acri on “Distorted Drug Patents””

Professor David Taylor on Patent Eligibility and Investment

The following post comes from Terence Yen, a 4E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Terence Yen In his new paper, Patent Eligibility and Investment, Professor David Taylor of the SMU Dedman School of Law explores whether the Supreme Court’s recent patent eligibility cases have changed the behavior of venture capital … Continue reading “Professor David Taylor on Patent Eligibility and Investment”

IP Scholars Question the Legality and Wisdom of Joint AG Proposal to Seize Remdesivir Patents

The following post comes from Colin Kreutzer, a 2E at Scalia Law and a Research Assistant at CPIP. By Colin Kreutzer While the vaccines are starting to roll out in the fight against COVID-19, the precise timelines for when they will be widely available continue to be uncertain. But we do have treatments currently available … Continue reading “IP Scholars Question the Legality and Wisdom of Joint AG Proposal to Seize Remdesivir Patents”

Professor Joanna Shepherd Explains Pharmaceutical Product Hopping in New CPIP Policy Brief

CPIP has published a new policy brief by Joanna M. Shepherd, Vice Dean and Thomas Simmons Professor of Law at Emory University School of Law. The brief, entitled The Legal and Industry Framework of Pharmaceutical Product Hopping and Considerations for Future Legislation, discusses the practice of so-called “product hopping,” where a pharmaceutical company turns its … Continue reading “Professor Joanna Shepherd Explains Pharmaceutical Product Hopping in New CPIP Policy Brief”