George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School

Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. This past Friday, the Board of Immigration Appeals held that criminal copyright infringement constitutes a “crime involving moral turpitude” under immigration law. The Board reasoned that criminal copyright infringement is inherently immoral because it involves the willful theft of property and causes harm to both the copyright owner and … Continue reading “Criminal Copyright Infringement is Crime of "Moral Turpitude"”

Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken

By Matthew Barblan & Kevin Madigan In 2013, CPIP published a policy brief by Professor Bruce Boyden exposing the DMCA notice and takedown system as outdated and in need of reform. The Failure of the DMCA Notice and Takedown System explained that while Section 512 of the DMCA was intended as a way for copyright … Continue reading “Three Years Later, DMCA Still Just as Broken”

Copyright Policy Should Be Based On Facts, Not Rhetoric

Here’s a brief excerpt of a post by Kevin Madigan & Devlin Hartline that was published on IPWatchdog. After nearly twenty years with the DMCA, the Copyright Office has launched a new study to examine the impact and effectiveness of this system, and voices on both sides of the debate have filed comments expressing their … Continue reading “Copyright Policy Should Be Based On Facts, Not Rhetoric”

No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful

Here’s a brief excerpt of an op-ed by Adam Mossoff & Devlin Hartline that was published in The Hill: Two recent op-eds published in The Hill argue that broad patent legislation—misleadingly labeled “reform”—is needed because the U.S. patent system is fundamentally broken. In the first, Timothy Lee contends that opponents “cannot with a straight face” … Continue reading “No Consensus That Broad Patent ‘Reform’ is Necessary or Helpful”

Last Chance to Register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference

Tomorrow is the last chance to register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference. The conference will be held next Tuesday, January 19th, at New York University’s Kimmel Center. In addition to Matthew Barblan and Devlin Hartline from CPIP, participants will come from the following organizations: ASCAP BMI CBS CCIA Charter Communications Cisco Copyright … Continue reading “Last Chance to Register for the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference”

Join Us at the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference on January 19

Co-produced by GiantSteps, the Copyright Society, and Musonomics, the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference will be held at New York University’s Kimmel Center on Tuesday, January 19th. CPIP is a proud Media Sponsor of the event. The conference program is available here, and registration is still open here. Jacqueline Charlesworth, General Counsel and Associate … Continue reading “Join Us at the Copyright and Technology NYC 2016 Conference on January 19”

BMG v. Cox: ISP Liability and the Power of Inference

Cross-posted from the Law Theories blog. As readers are likely aware, the jury verdict in BMG v. Cox was handed down on December 17th. The jury found that BMG had proved by a preponderance of the evidence that Cox’s users were direct infringers and that Cox is contributorily liable for that infringement. The interesting thing, … Continue reading “BMG v. Cox: ISP Liability and the Power of Inference”

Protecting Artists from Streaming Piracy Benefits Creativity and Technology

Here’s a brief excerpt of an op-ed by Devlin Hartline & Matthew Barblan that was published in The Hill: In his recent op-ed in The Hill, Mike Montgomery argues that “[m]aking streaming copyright infringement a felony is a terrible idea” that will create “further rifts between tech and entertainment at a time when these two … Continue reading “Protecting Artists from Streaming Piracy Benefits Creativity and Technology”

Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review

Last week, CPIP published a new white paper, Copyright Principles and Priorities to Foster a Creative Digital Marketplace, by Sandra Aistars, Mark Schultz, and myself, which draws from the testimonies and scholarly writings of CPIP Senior Scholars in order to guide Congress as it continues its comprehensive review of the Copyright Act. The white paper … Continue reading “Principles and Priorities to Guide Congress’s Ongoing Copyright Review”

Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole

We’ve released a new policy brief, Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole, by Devlin Hartline & Matthew Barblan. They argue that in order to protect authors and artists from having their works repeatedly stolen on the internet, it is long past time to harmonize the remedies for criminal copyright infringement to reflect … Continue reading “Protecting Authors and Artists by Closing the Streaming Loophole”