A Critique of a Recent Article Which Found That Sequence Patents Cover the Entire Human Genome

By Professor Christopher Holman [The following is a blog posting by Christopher Holman, a patent law scholar at UMKC School of Law, that he originally posted on April 5, 2013 at his blog, Holman’s Biotech IP Blog, where Professor Holman regularly blogs on important issues in biotech and IP law.  Professor Holman kindly gave us permission to … Continue reading “A Critique of a Recent Article Which Found That Sequence Patents Cover the Entire Human Genome”

How Copyright Drives Innovation in Scholarly Publishing

[Cross posted at Truth on the Market] Today’s public policy debates frame copyright policy solely in terms of a “trade off” between the benefits of incentivizing new works and the social deadweight losses imposed by the access restrictions imposed by these (temporary) “monopolies.” I recently posted to SSRN a new research paper, called How Copyright … Continue reading “How Copyright Drives Innovation in Scholarly Publishing”

Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman

Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, U.S. Supreme Court, decided March 19, 2013 Chris Newman Assistant Professor of Law George Mason University School of Law This is best described as a decision in which the Court felt compelled to choose between two readings of the Copyright Act, either of which led to unpalatable results.   One reading … Continue reading “Summary of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons by Professor Chris Newman”

The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws

[Cross-Posted at Truth on the Market on March 15, 2013] Earlier this month, Representatives Peter DeFazio and Jason Chaffetz picked up the gauntlet from President Obama’s comments on February 14 at a Google-sponsored Internet Q&A on Google+ that “our efforts at patent reform only went about halfway to where we need to go” and that … Continue reading “The SHIELD Act: When Bad Economic Studies Make Bad Laws”

Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act

By Michael Risch [The following is a blog posting by Michael Risch, a patent law scholar at Villanova Law School, that he originally posted on March 10, 2013 at the law professor group blog, Madisonian.net, where Professor Risch regularly blogs.  Professor Risch kindly gave us permission to repost his blog posting here.] Scratching my Head Over the … Continue reading “Scratching my Head Over the SHIELD Act”

Patented Innovation and Patent Wars: Some Historical Perspective

[This was originally posted at IBM’s A Smarter Planet Blog on January 11, 2013.] The America Invents Act (AIA) was signed into law in September 2011, and it is rightly recognized as “the most significant reform of the U.S. patent system since 1836.”  The AIA’s provisions are not even fully implemented yet — its ink … Continue reading “Patented Innovation and Patent Wars: Some Historical Perspective”

Where Are the Creators? Consider Creators in Copyright Reform

Note:  This post was cross-posted at the CATO Unbound on 2/1/2013.  The January 2013 issue of CATO Unbound feature a debate on copyright reform, Opportunities for Copyright Reform This post responds to the discussion in that issue, but it also stands alone as a critique of copyright reform proposals that favor to consider the importance of creators. … Continue reading “Where Are the Creators? Consider Creators in Copyright Reform”

Today’s Software Patents Look a Lot Like Early Pharma Patents

[Cross Posted to Truth on the Market] The recent New York Times article on the high-tech industry argues that software patents and the current “smart phone war” are a disaster for innovation, and it backs this with quotes and cites from a horde of academics and judges, like Judge Richard Posner, that software patents are … Continue reading “Today’s Software Patents Look a Lot Like Early Pharma Patents”

The “Patent Litigation Explosion” Canard

[Cross Posted to Truth on the Market on October 18, 2012] We often hear today that there’s an unprecedented “patent litigation explosion” that’s killing innovation. Last week, the New York Times plied this claim without abandon in its hit piece on high-tech patents.  It’s become so commonplace that this phrase garners over 1.3 million hits … Continue reading “The “Patent Litigation Explosion” Canard”

The “Common Law Property” Myth in the Libertarian Critique of IP Rights (Part 2)

[Cross Posted to Truth on the Market on December 12, 2012] In Part One, I addressed the argument by some libertarians that so-called “traditional property rights in land” are based in inductive, ground-up “common law court decisions,” but that intellectual property (IP) rights are top-down, artificial statutory entitlements.  Thus, for instance, libertarian law professor, Tom … Continue reading “The “Common Law Property” Myth in the Libertarian Critique of IP Rights (Part 2)”